CFS Loves 80

20 unmissable paintings in London, including  Jan Van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait | Time Out

Jan Van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait

Requiem Lass, an interview with Patti Smith | New York Times

Requium Lass - Patti Smith

Online Checkout – In Real Life, with all the drama of a time-out | Google Analytics

20 Lessons for Creatives from Miranda July, words from a powerhouse | Nextness

Miranda July

Winter Wonderland, Eniko Mihalik by Terry Richardson | Harper’s Bazaar 

Harpers Bazaar - Winter Wonderland

Collated satellite views of the Imperial Valley, otherworldly views of crops | Lillian Wilkie

Imperial Valley

The Chameleon, a fascinating account of French child impersonator Frederic Bourdin | The New Yorker

Frederic Bourdin

Austin Diaries, enticing photos of Texan vintage | Sea of Shoes

Austin Diaries - Sea of Shoes

Badlands – an Oral History, the turbulent making of Terrence Malick’s first film | GQ

Badlands

An archive of fantastic old French posters | Galerie Montmartre

Vintage French Poster Archive

A simple DIY side table | Design*Sponge

Simple DIY Side Table

 

CFS loves 79

 TEA! The English love tea. I seem to be offered a cup of the stuff everywhere I go. While I love tea, Earl Grey is not for me and  mostly I opt for green. Here is some interesting browsing to go with your cuppa of choice.

stack

  • Jessica Stanley’s  The Quiet Tourists Guide to Hackney couldn’t be more timely! It’s an insider’s view on everything that’s good and great in East London. As it’s all local to me, I will be merging this list with my London must-see list.
Mad Jack Fullers Grave
  • What Girls Need. So refreshing and insightful. Read this now, whether you have a vagina or not.
  • Back to the Future – this meme has gone on for a while, but here’s a batch of fresh recreations of family photographs. I’m tempted to make my own!

Party Animal Candle Holders

  • The Beekeeper’s Bible is high on my reading list with a ‘extensive history of beekeeping section, a food and drink section, a domestic uses for bee products section AND a craft section’.

Steve Jobs flipping the bird to IBM

 

Do You Ever Get Talker’s Block?

No one ever gets talker’s block. No one wakes up in the morning, discovers he has nothing to say and sits quietly, for days or weeks, until the muse hits, until the moment is right, until all the craziness in his life has died down.

Why then, is writer’s block endemic?

The reason we don’t get talker’s block is that we’re in the habit of talking without a lot of concern for whether or not our inane blather will come back to haunt us. Talk is cheap. Talk is ephemeral. Talk can be easily denied.

We talk poorly and then, eventually (or sometimes), we talk smart. We get better at talking precisely because we talk. We see what works and what doesn’t, and if we’re insightful, do more of what works. How can one get talker’s block after all this practice?

Writer’s block isn’t hard to cure.

Just write poorly. Continue to write poorly, in public, until you can write better.

– the marvelous Seth Godin, writing about the myth of writer’s block .

Career advice

Work You Do While You Procrastinate

Thoughtful career advice from designer Jessica Hische, illustrated smartly by Chris Piascik. Isn’t it lovely?

My procrastination techniques include – making coffee, organising my room, planning exotic holidays, writing fiction, watching Come Dine With Me while writing up notes… It’s all an endlessly inspiring loop though. Writing is my passion, and whether that manifests as writing perfume reviews (check!), crafting websites at a digital agency (check!), or noodling away at a cookbook (one day!) – it’s all good. Knowing what I really love to do is a real blessing. How do you guys while the hours away?

{via Fancy! NZ Design Blog}

September dreams

September: poem

[via Louniverse]

 

I am really looking forward to my first autumnal September. I remember visiting New York in October, and suddenly Halloween made sense; the end of harvest and darkening of days, not strawberries and 8pm sunsets. I’ve spent a long time in topsy-turvy land… It’s now time for scarves, crisp mornings and falling leaves.

CFS loves 78

Urban Stargazing: Hunter

  • Where Children Sleep –  by James Mollison features children from around the world, and their bedrooms. It’s a provocative, moving series – and will make you ask a lot of questions about the rights of children.
  • Hello! I want a one of these Peugeot café racers. It’s such a sweet moped, forget the pedals, let’s go gas.
  • How to talk to little girls. Yes, yes, yes. This approach (engaging them not complimenting them)  is good! And works excellently with  grown women too. “Cute shoes” is such a dire way to start a conversation.

CFS loves 77

Karen & Avril's kitchen - The Selby

Sunglasses Strap - Sic Gloria

No More “Shoulds”

Emily Christensen - Filly

“I dropped out of law school when I was twenty-four and returned to my hometown of Santa Cruz, California. I did not have a plan but I did have a promise: no more “shoulds”. I was determined to follow my heart wherever it wanted to go.

In the following years I worked as a bicycle messenger, learned to garden, fell in love, sold my car and for the first time felt truly competent and at home in my own skin. I began to notice and be taken with my own physicality: the crook of my arm holding the shovel, my thighs tightening as I pedaled, my hands strong and stained by the day. These were common moments when function was unexpectedly beautiful. This, I determined, was a form of beauty I needed to capture and express.

So I began to make things, with metal, with wood, and eventually with fabric. And here, where the practical and the precious come together, was where my heart led me. I enrolled at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco for clothing design. Two years later I started Filly.”

– Emily Christensen, who makes beautiful, conscientious clothes under the label Filly.
Her house is pretty too.

[via Royal Quiet Deluxe]