Spore fund

In a similar vein to 3M (they came up with the idea first) and Google’s generous 15% free time allowance,  I love Wieden and Kennedy’s idea of a ‘Spore fund‘. Basically, it’s a pot of money set aside to fund creative ideas that might not have anything to do with the agency’s day-to-day projects. One recipient put the dosh towards creating a peek-a-boo, Snapchat look-book for a lingerie brand, which is rather clever.

Miss Crofton Snapchat

Sod innovation and futures departments, I’d love to see this in more companies – even just a tiny sum could make a real difference in terms of morale and innovation.

Whaaaat

Just read Oliver Burkeman’s latest column in the Guardian. This week it’s about the wonderfully named “what-the-hell effect” – the idea that just one won’t hurt, we can try again tomorrow. This part struck a chord:

“The what-the-hell effect is usually interpreted, rightly, as an argument for setting more realistic goals. Instead of promising you’ll eat no unhealthy foods, or spend nothing on fripperies, build in a safety valve: permit yourself one self-indulgent item a day, or a certain amount of money a week. Better yet, replace “inhibitional” goals – the intention to stop doing things – with “acquisitional goals”, focused on obtaining or achieving something.”

Slow down

I read this quote today while researching a hunch I had about the link between social media and gambling. It’s about Facebook:

“I don’t really like it,” he said.  “It seems to me that people who are on a lot are denying a couple things.  They’re making time not exist – the speed of it, the instant back and forth.  And, they’re denying that people grow apart.”

Like matrons flirting with one armed bandits, I find myself increasingly refreshing the page, hoping for a little red pop-up, a reward for being witty, interesting or cute. To be honest, I feel like a rat who gets a pellet for pushing the correct buttons. No matter how much praise I get, I still want more, and I want it now. Do the words mean anything to me, or is it just the thrill of the red bubble?

From now on, I want to concentrate on slowing down. When I travel, I prefer to linger, enjoying the passage of time and the ‘I wish things would never end’ sentiment (I’m the only girl I know who hass spent 10 days straight in Bangkok, not going to the islands). Why not apply this chrono-appreciation to the every day? Learn to savour the slow things in life…

The other point about cultivating dead friendships struck me too. Perhaps we should appreciate them as flowers, and accept sometimes they’ll wither away. Again, if they’re worth saving, we should take our time in reviving them, using love and face to face interaction.

With those fresh thoughts in my head, here are several beautiful things that are slow, delightful and worth taking time over:

Bread rising…

Weekend sleep-ins…

Train travel…

Processing film and printing photos

Fromage…

Reading books…

Crystals…

Walking or even rambling…

Brewing your own ginger beer

Let’s take our time?